Ghost Writers

If someone is a member of fifty activity groups, the chances of him or her coming to a writers’ workshop and sitting still long enough to write a story are pretty slim.

The writers’ group I founded in Abu Dhabi back in June 2015 now has 1,952 members. A group of these writer-members meets weekly, and out of around sixteen who sign up on the Meetup site for our free workshop sessions, usually about eight turn up to take their places in the café where we meet. What happens each week to the other eight, one can only guess. One assumes they were abducted on their way to the workshop. Sometimes we never ever hear from them again.

RIP

Many of our would-be attendees have plenty to say for themselves. Some send messages to say that they ‘really want to come’ to our workshop, and ‘definitely intend to come,’ but they are ‘just so busy at the moment.’ Well, with those fifty other groups to attend, they would be, wouldn’t they?

Some say they would indeed come if I could only move the group into the centre of town, or if I could change the meeting time, or if I could shift the day of meeting. Of course, call their bluff and change the location and the timings, and not only do those people not show up, but they vanish from the face of the earth. This is why we now refer to them as… ghost writers.

I sometimes wonder if analyzing the nature of the other groups chosen by these writers would give me a profile of the type of people who sign up for a writers’ group that they most likely won’t attend. Meetups much loved by our ghost writers include: the Abu Dhabi Blockchain & Cryptocurrency Meetup, the Abu Dhabi Agile Scrum Exchange, The Abu Dhabi Bucket Listers, The Abu Dhabi Corniche Boot Camp, The Abu Dhabi Dance Lessons Meetup, the Abu Dhabi Civil Engineering Meetup, and the Abu Dhabi Meditation group.Meet Up Logo

I like to keep an open mind. Many of our best writers have come not from the English departments of schools and universities, but from oil companies and IT departments. I also tell myself that I should be very happy when those who are expected do not show up. It must mean that the group has served its purpose of giving them a sense of community and motivation and, as a result, they are comfortably ensconced at their desks hammering out the ideas that will make up the next chapter of their book.

I mean… they won’t be in a shopping mall or at the cinema, will they?

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The Write Stuff: short stories

In case you’re wondering if any good comes out of being part of a writers’ group… well, it does. This month sees the publication of The Write Stuff, a collection of stories by members of the Abu Dhabi Writers’ Workshop. These are all writers who stuck with the group, read, listened, discussed, and wrote their socks off.

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Of the 14 whose work appears in the anthology, at least four are first-time authors who thought that the chance of ever getting published was either impossible or remote. But today, they are in print and on the path to future writing successes.

My formula for becoming a writer: read a lot, write a lot, re-write a lot, read some more. Don’t rush through books just to clock up numbers. You’re a writer, so read in order to learn how others write.

The Write Stuff is available now on amazon.com, on amazon.co.uk, and on Kindle.

 

Abu Dhabi Stories – Call for submissions

New York, London, Paris, Tokyo – these cities and many others have been the setting for stories of mystery, crime, adventure, love. We’d like you to call on your first-hand experience of the UAE to set your story in Abu Dhabi. This is a call for submissions to our upcoming short story anthology: Abu Dhabi Stories. Read on for further details.

IMG_2466Deadline: 30 November, 2018

Word Count: Minimum length 250 words. Maximum length 2,500 words.

Send to: adww2015@hotmail.com

Please read our ‘Information & Guidelines’ before submitting:

Information & Guidelines

 Your entry should

  • be fiction, and must have an Abu Dhabi theme or connection.
  • be between 250 and 2,500 words in length.
  • be in English.
  • have a title.

Format your story in Times New Roman, 12pt, with double-line spacing, and page numbers.

Type your word count in the top right-hand corner of page 1.

Label your Word document with the title of your story and your name, e.g., Great Expectations – Charles Dickens

Send your Word document entry to adww2015@hotmail.com You can enter a maximum of two stories.

Put Abu Dhabi Stories in the subject line of your e-mail

Submitting your work to the anthology is free, but you should be a member of our Abu Dhabi Writers’ Workshop Meet-Up group, and/or a member of The Abu Dhabi Writers’ Workshop Facebook group. If you are a former member, but have left the UAE, please join our Facebook group to keep in touch. Membership of both the Meet-Up group and the Facebook group is free. There is no charge for attendance at our Wednesday night workshops.

Address any queries about submissions by e-mail to Janet Olearski at adww2015@hotmail.com or in person to Kwame Dadson at our Wednesday workshops.

 

Solitude and the writer

Why do writers need silence and solitude?

Surely writers can write anywhere – in public places and in cafés, for example? Why would they even need to go to workshops or on writers’ retreats? Why can’t writers lock out their family and write in a room at home? Why do they complain when people make a noise and ‘disturb’ them?

Does contrived solitude work? Do writers produce more when they are alone, or when they are surrounded by others?

Your inner creative voice

Writers need just enough silence and solitude to listen to their inner creative voice. We have many inner voices and the worst, of course, is the one that beats you up for the things you haven’t done and should do. We’ve been taught to kill that voice. We’ve been taught to talk back to it and sort it out. Remember that book by Shad Helmstetter, What to say when you talk to your self? But, when slaughtering the bad voice, we need to take care not to lose the creative one. It’s down there somewhere, and your life as a writer is so much more difficult if you can’t hear it.

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Turning down the external volume

You go out, you have fun, you surround yourself with friends, you discuss, you argue, you tell jokes. Do all of that on a regular basis and there is way too much external noise. You will never hear the voice that has come up with a memory, an idea, a what-if, the description of a character, or an opening line to some story you haven’t thought of yet. So, you need to turn down the external volume and listen out for what that voice is saying.

Abu Dhabi, home to our Abu Dhabi Writers’ Workshop, is not the best of places to be a writer. There is something for you to see and do every evening of the week: a film screening, an exhibition opening, a musical performance, a play, a comedy show, a guest speaker, a debate, a dinner with friends. And after each of those activities, you are obliged to post photos of the event on social media to show that you were there along with the rest of the in-crowd, the people who are in the places that are trending.

But what about your writing? You won’t be hearing your inner creative voice with all that going on.

Solutions

There are various solutions. Some are drastic.

  • You could stop going out and do what you originally committed to do – write. At a writers’ conference, author Terry Pratchett once gave a plenary address entitled, ‘Why are you listening to me when you should be at home writing?’
  • You could give up writing. You may need to acknowledge that you are not sufficiently committed to writing to give up your social life and spend the necessary time drafting and re-drafting your work.
  • You could go to a writers’ workshop and find enough temporary focus to hear that voice and write for thirty or forty minutes. This can definitely get you started, though it is not a permanent solution. Your workshop will provide you with input and support, and it will give you that brief period of head space that you need to get some new ideas down on paper. To be a successful writer, however, you need to be able to write independently of your writers’ workshop. Did Dickens go to a writers’ workshop? Did Hemingway?

SolitudeDo not delude yourself. If you can’t write on your own – and that means being able to turn down the external volume to hear what’s in your head – you won’t be able to write in that expensive writers’ retreat or in that romantic garret in Paris.

 Listen

So, train yourself to be silent. Limit your socializing. If your socializing is full-time and your writing is supposed to be full-time, one of those is not going to work. Decide which it is to be. Find a time of day to think and write when there are fewer distractions, and let that creative voice filter through. Listen to it and then quickly write down everything it says.

If you can do this, you will never be short of ideas and you will become your own support system.

Writers on the edge

Lots of writers out there are ‘on the edge.’ Perhaps they are not writers at all, but they are thinking about writing and they are almost or nearly writing. The purpose of a writers’ workshop as I see it is to get these writers on track or, if they have strayed, to get them back on track. This is one of the reasons why I set up The Abu Dhabi Writers’ Workshop – to support writers, but also to help them help themselves.

The Abu Dhabi Writers’ Workshop, which met for the first time in June 2015, has held over 30 sessions and run over 90 workshop hours. At the last count there were 606 members. Most of our regular writers have set their goals and are most definitely on track. However, it’s now possible to have a better overview of the issues encountered by some of our newer writers and from time to time I hope to discuss these here on the All Write In Abu Dhabi blog.

How our writers write, their writing process, comes up for discussion on a regular basis. I think there are warning signals that we need to watch out for that indicate all is not well with our writing process. Here are some of them.

You need to review your writing process if …

  • you’ve been writing for a long while and have little to show for it;
  • you lack the ideas and inspiration to keep going;
  • you’ve lost your direction;
  • you’ve lost sight of the story you wanted to write;
  • your rough draft hasn’t moved on for some time;
  • you keep adding subplots to your novel;
  • you write infrequently;
  • you read only rarely.

I’m sure I can come up with other signals, but these should be enough to get us started.

Obviously people take different approaches to their writing. The way you write may not suit me. The way I write may not suit you. The three approaches most commonly described in the how-to-write literature are as follows:

Pantser writing – called this because it is when people write ‘by the seat of their pants.’ These writers begin writing, then figure out where their story is going as they write. Sometimes this works very well. Sometimes it is a disaster with the writer ending up wandering about in the dark wood of the soul.

Freestyle writing – in which the writer writes scenes out of order and then organizes those scenes into a coherent structure.

Outline writing – here the writer puts together a detailed outline, working out who does what and when, and adding in the related subplots. When everything is in place, they go full speed ahead and write their first draft. Have a look at this video in which crime writer Jeffery Deaver explains his approach to outlining:

There are no rules. You can write the way you want to. However, successful writers usually establish the rules that work for them and stick to those rules. If your novel is getting written, and if your work is getting published, you’re doing something right. If you’re floundering in a mire of words, join us at The Abu Dhabi Writers’ Workshop and find out about the writing processes favoured by our most seasoned and successful writers.